Cymraeg

The Experiences of Women in World War One

A collection of information, experiences and photographs recorded by Women's Archive of Wales in 2014-18

A collection of information, experiences and photographs recorded by Women's Archive of Wales in 2014-18

Browse the collection


Sorted by date of death

Emma May Inker (Stevens)

Place of birth: Penarth

Service: Cook, WAAC / WRAF, 1918/03/15 – 1918/12/31

Death: 1992, Cause not known

Notes: Emma, born 2nd May 1894, worked as a seamstress and in service before joining the WAAC in March 1918. Shortly afterwards she was transferred to the WRAF on its formation on 1st April 1918. She was discharged on compassionate grounds on 31st December as her father was ill. Her daughter Rita Spinola says ‘She never talked much about her time in WW1 as a cook, but she did mention that once whilst marching in London someone shouted out to her “you’re out of step!”.’

Reference: WaW0267

WRAFs at the RAF Brigade sports. Emma Inker can just be seen in the second row between the 6th and 7th people sitting on the ground. Thanks to Rita Spinola.

RAF Brigade sports

WRAFs at the RAF Brigade sports. Emma Inker can just be seen in the second row between the 6th and 7th people sitting on the ground. Thanks to Rita Spinola.

Close-up of Emma May Inker WRAF at the RAF Brigade Sports 1918. Thanks to Rita Spinola.

Emma May Inker

Close-up of Emma May Inker WRAF at the RAF Brigade Sports 1918. Thanks to Rita Spinola.


WRAF discharge paper for Emma Inker on ‘compassionate grounds’. This shows her transfer from WAAC to WRAF.

WRAF Discharge Certificate

WRAF discharge paper for Emma Inker on ‘compassionate grounds’. This shows her transfer from WAAC to WRAF.


Helen Smith (Thomas)

Place of birth: Swansea

Service: Child

Death: 1993, Swansea, Cause not known

Notes: Helen Smith, born 1908, was the daughter of Alfred and Elizabeth Smith of Swansea who emigrated to America when Helen was a few months old. In 1915 they decided to return to Swansea, and sailed on the Lusitania. When the ship was torpedoed on 7th May 1915 Helen had become separated from her parents and baby brother Hubert. They died, but she was rescued by a Canadian journalist, Ernest Cowper. She was reunited with her aunt Cecelia Owens, another passenger who had lost her two sons in the sinking. She later married John Henry Thomas and lived the rest of her life in Swansea.

Sources: http://www.rmslusitania.info/people/second-cabin/helen-smith/

Reference: WaW0227

Helen Smith with her rescuer Ernest Cowper. Photograph taken in Queenstown, County Cork, Ireland. Helen is wearing new clothes donated by local well-wishers.

Helen Smith

Helen Smith with her rescuer Ernest Cowper. Photograph taken in Queenstown, County Cork, Ireland. Helen is wearing new clothes donated by local well-wishers.

Report of the story of Lusitania survivor Helen Smith (1). Cambrian Daily Leader 10 May 1915

Newspaper report (1)

Report of the story of Lusitania survivor Helen Smith (1). Cambrian Daily Leader 10 May 1915


Report of the story of Lusitania survivor Helen Smith (2). Cambrian Daily Leader 10 May 1915

Newspaper report (2)

Report of the story of Lusitania survivor Helen Smith (2). Cambrian Daily Leader 10 May 1915

Report of the story of Lusitania survivor Helen Smith (3). Cambrian Daily Leader 10 May 1915

Newspaper report (3)

Report of the story of Lusitania survivor Helen Smith (3). Cambrian Daily Leader 10 May 1915


May Selwood

Place of birth: Newport

Service: Wife, widow

Death: 1995-11-03, Cause not known

Notes: May’s husband William Henry Selwood died of shell shock on 1st January 1919. She remained a widow for her remaining 76 years – credited with being the longest WW1 widow in Britain. She is buried in Christchurch Cemetery, Newport.

Reference: WaW0106

Grave of May Selwood who is credited with being the longest WW1 widow in Britain. Christchurch Cemetery, Newport

Grave of May Selwood

Grave of May Selwood who is credited with being the longest WW1 widow in Britain. Christchurch Cemetery, Newport

Death Notice of William Henry Selwood, died 1st January 1919

Death Notice of William Henry Selwood

Death Notice of William Henry Selwood, died 1st January 1919


Maria Eley

Place of birth: Cardiff

Service: Rugby player, munitions worker

Death: 2007, Cause not known

Notes: Maria Eley played fullback for Cardiff Ladies Rugby Team during 1917 and 1918, including a match against Newport ladies in Cardiff Arms Park on December 16th 1917, when she was 16 years old. Cardiff lost. Maria died in 2007 aged 106.

Sources: http://www.scrumqueens.com/news/wales-v-uk-forces-99-years https://cardiffrugbymuseum.org/articles/earliest-photograph-women%E2%80%99s-team

Reference: WaW0240

Advertisement for Grand Rugby Match 16th December 1917. Western Morning News.

Newspaper advertisement

Advertisement for Grand Rugby Match 16th December 1917. Western Morning News.

Cardiff Ladies Rugby Team, probably taken 16th December 1917. Maria is sitting middle row left.

Maria Eley

Cardiff Ladies Rugby Team, probably taken 16th December 1917. Maria is sitting middle row left.


Cutting giving the score of the match played on 15th December 1917. Source not known.

Press cutting

Cutting giving the score of the match played on 15th December 1917. Source not known.


Katherine Conway-Jones

Place of birth: Bangor

Service: Nurse, TFNS, 1914 - 1917

Death: After / Ar ôl 1947, Cause not known

Notes: Katherine Conway-Jones, born around 1880, trained at the Leicester Infirmary; this was renamed the 5th Northern General Hospital in 1914 (and subsequently changed back). In 1915 she volunteered for foreign service, initially serving in France and subsequently on hospital ships serving the Dardanelles, Egypt, India, Mesopotamia and German East Africa. She was appointed Matron of HMHS Oxfordshire in April 1916. In the summer of 1917, declared ‘unfit for further service in the tropics, but fit for service in Egypt’, she returned to the UK on the New Zealand hospital ship Maheno, where she also served as Matron. She spent the rest of her time back in Leicester.She was mentioned in despatches three times, and was awarded the Royal Red Cross second class in 1916 for her work in the Dardanelles, and first class in 1917 for bravery during the mining of SS Tyndareus off South Africa. Her medals were sold for £2800 in 2015.rnAfter leaving the TFNS in 1919 she emigrated to Canada to set up a small-holding on Lulu Island, Vancouver, with Julia Hamilton, a Canadian nurse whom she had met in Salonika.A large file of Katherine’s official papers survives in the National Archives.

Sources: National Archives WO 399_10526

Reference: WaW0273

Katherine was Matron on this ship, travelling through Suez to India and back to S and E Africa.

HMHS Oxfordshire

Katherine was Matron on this ship, travelling through Suez to India and back to S and E Africa.

Report of Katherine Conway-Jones award of the Royal Red Cross. Y Dydd 22nd June 1917.

Newspaper report

Report of Katherine Conway-Jones award of the Royal Red Cross. Y Dydd 22nd June 1917.


Letter from K C-J attempting to claim retrospectively the Mesopotamian Allowance to which nurses working east of Suez were entitled. She was refused, though tried again in 1947.

Letter

Letter from K C-J attempting to claim retrospectively the Mesopotamian Allowance to which nurses working east of Suez were entitled. She was refused, though tried again in 1947.

Letter from K C-J attempting to claim retrospectively the Mesopotamian Allowance to which nurses working east of Suez were entitled. She was refused, though tried again in 1947. (reverse)

Letter (reverse)

Letter from K C-J attempting to claim retrospectively the Mesopotamian Allowance to which nurses working east of Suez were entitled. She was refused, though tried again in 1947. (reverse)


Annie Mary Slade (Hall)

Place of birth: Pentre, Rhondda

Service: Munitioms worker, 1916 - 1919

Death: After 2003, Cause not known

Notes: Annie Slade was born in 1903. Her mother was originally from Aberystwyth and her father ‘a bit of a boss’ in the pit. (He died as a result of an injury when Annie was a young teenager). She and her family were lucky to survive a tip slide in 1909. Aged 15 and a half she joined the WAAC in Newport, but her age was discovered (she was on a list to be sent to France) and she and her friend were discharged. At 16 she began working for the National Shell Filling Factory at Rotherwas, Hereford. A long account of her experiences was published in In the Munitions: Women at War in Herefordshire, when she was 100 years old.

Sources: In the Munitions: Women at War in Herefordshire, edited Bill Laws 2003.

Reference: WaW0285

Annie Hall née Slade in old age.

Annie Hall née Slade.

Annie Hall née Slade in old age.

Report of the Pentre landslide in which Annie’s family’s house was destroyed. Evening Express 8th February 1909

Newspaper report

Report of the Pentre landslide in which Annie’s family’s house was destroyed. Evening Express 8th February 1909


Alice Helena Alexandra Williams (Alys Meirion)

Place of birth: Castell Deudraeth, Penrhyndeudraeth, Meirioneth

Service: Poet, dramatist, painter, suffragist, organiser, bard, editor.

Death: August / Awst 1957, London, Cause not known

Notes: Alice Williams, born in 1863, was the youngest of 12 children of David Williams, MP for Merioneth. Having to live at home as her mother’s companion she occupied herself in eisteddfodau, amateur dramatics and women’s suffrage. After her mother’s death, when Alice was forty, she divided much of her time between London and Paris, where she met her lifelong companion Fanny Laming. At the outbreak of the war they both worked for the International Red Cross in Geneva, but in 1915 she set up a bureau in Paris (and later London) to seek and disseminate news of persons missing as a result of the war. Later that year she became organising secretary for Wales of the French Wounded Emergency Fund. She was awarded the Médaille de la Reconnaissance Française in 1920. In 1916 she was founder/President of the fourth branch of the Women’s Institute in Wales (at Deudraeth), providing it with the hall which is still in use. She also was the founder editor of Home and Country, the WI magazine. At the 1917 Eisteddfod she was admitted (as a dramatic writer) to the Gorsedd of Bards, taking the bardic name Alys Meirion. Immediately after the war, in 1919, she and Fanny founded the residential Forum Club in London, a popular social space for women only, including Viscountess Rhondda.

Sources: http://yba.llgc.org.uk/en/s10-WILL-ALE-1863.html\r\nwww.thewi.org.uk/about-the-wi/history-of-the-wi/the-origins/alice-williams\r\nhttp://femalewarpoets.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/todays-poet-is-welsh.

Reference: WaW0295

Alice Williams about 1930

Alice Williams

Alice Williams about 1930

Announcement of award of Médaille de la Reconnaissance Française to Alice Williams. Journal Officiel de la Republique Française 22nd October 1920rnrn

Award of Médaille de la Reconnaissance Française

Announcement of award of Médaille de la Reconnaissance Française to Alice Williams. Journal Officiel de la Republique Française 22nd October 1920rnrn


First edition of the WI magazine Home and Country, which was edited by Alice Williams. She is second from the right in the photograph. She also served as the WI Treasurer

Home and Country magazine

First edition of the WI magazine Home and Country, which was edited by Alice Williams. She is second from the right in the photograph. She also served as the WI Treasurer

Bookplate of the Forum Club, London, founded by Alice Williams and Fanny Lanbury.

Bookplate

Bookplate of the Forum Club, London, founded by Alice Williams and Fanny Lanbury.


Annie Roach

Place of birth: Swansea

Service: Nurse, 1914 - December 1915

Death: December / Rhagfyr 1, Great Yarmouth, Enteric fever / Ffliw enterig

Notes: Annie, who was 21 when she died, contracted enteric fever from a sailor patient in the isolation hospital in Great Yarmouth. Her body was brought back to Swansea, and she was buried in Dan y Graig cemetery, Swansea.

Reference: WaW0354

Report of the death of Annie Roach, Herlad of Wales 8th January 1916.

Newspaper article and photograph

Report of the death of Annie Roach, Herlad of Wales 8th January 1916.


Helena Susanna Adam

Place of birth: Belgium

Service: Refugee

Death: December 1916, School House, Pantycaws, Carbon monoxide poisoning / Gwenwyno gan garbon monocsid

Notes: Helena Adam was a 51 year-old Belgian refugee living with her family near Carmarthen. They arrived from Ostend in November 1914. Her death was caused by fumes from a fire warming their bedroom. The fire was made partly of culm, coal dust mixed with clay and other materials, which was much used at this time owing to the high price of coal. Helena’s husband Jacobus was also affected but later recovered.

Reference: WaW0388

Report on the inquest on Helena Susanna Adam. Herald of Wales 11th December 1915

Newspaper report

Report on the inquest on Helena Susanna Adam. Herald of Wales 11th December 1915

Another report on the inquest on Helena Susanna Adam. South Wales Weekly Post 11th December 1915.

Newspaper report

Another report on the inquest on Helena Susanna Adam. South Wales Weekly Post 11th December 1915.


Ezzelina Samuel

Place of birth: Pontardulais

Service: Nurse, 1916 - 1919

Death: February 1919 , Kemptown hospital, Brighton, Bronchitis following influenza / Broncitis yn dilyn ffliw

Notes: Ezzelina was one of eight children of Thomas Samuel, superintendent of the Clayton Tin Plate Works, Pontardulais. She was sitting her final exams after three year’s training as a nurse in Brighton when she fell ill and died, aged 24.

Reference: WaW0278

Short article noting Ezzelina’s death, with a photograph. Herald of Wales 1st March 1919rnrn

Newspaper article and phoograph

Short article noting Ezzelina’s death, with a photograph. Herald of Wales 1st March 1919rnrn

Report of the death of Ezzelina Samuel in Brighton. Carmarthen Journal 7th March 1919rnrn

newspaper report

Report of the death of Ezzelina Samuel in Brighton. Carmarthen Journal 7th March 1919rnrn



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